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PRIMETIME
Air Date: Tuesday, September 11, 2007
Time Slot: 10:00 PM-11:00 PM EST on ABC
Episode Title: (#C106) "CRIME"
[NOTE: The following article is a press release issued by the aforementioned network and/or company. Any errors, typos, etc. are attributed to the original author. The release is reproduced solely for the dissemination of the enclosed information.]

SEASON FINALE

TWO STORIES OF YOUNG WOMEN MYSTERIOUSLY MURDERED, ON THE SEASON FINALE OF ABC'S "PRIMETIME: CRIME," SEPTEMBER 11 ON ABC

In her short career as an up-and-coming on-air reporter, 22-year-old Jennifer Servo had covered murders before. But she never got to cover what would become perhaps the most baffling unsolved murder in Texas -- her own. Servo was found bludgeoned and strangled in her apartment in Abilene, Texas in 2002. She had recently broken off a relationship with a man her family was leery of and was spending time with a new man, a colleague at work. Was one of them responsible for her murder? Or was it someone else? John Qui�ones investigates on the Season Finale of "Primetime: Crime," TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11 (10:00-11:00 p.m., ET) on the ABC Television Network.

Servo had recently ended a long-term relationship when she met Ralph Sepulveda, a former Army ranger, whom her family didn't approve of. The two had only known each other for a few weeks when they decided Sepulveda would give up his life in Montana to come with her to Abilene. But three weeks later, her relationship with Sepulveda was heading downhill. According to her family, Servo discovered that Sepulveda had had a fianc�e when they met, whom he had promptly broken up with. They say she also found out he had a child whom he never saw. Her sister, Christa, tells ABC, "That was pretty much a deal-breaker for her." Her family says Servo kicked him out. According to one of Servo's friends, Sepulveda was upset but not angry. He moved to another apartment complex in Abilene and found a job, and as far as anyone knew, seemed to have moved on.

On September 15, 2002, Servo did the 10:00 p.m. news with Brian Travers, a 23-year-old weatherman at the station whom she was spending time with. The two left that evening to do some errands together. In explaining their relationship, Travers said they were briefly intimate, but he tells "Primetime," "She had told me that she just wanted to just be close friends." Travers was the last person to see her on that night before someone climbed the stairs to her apartment and murdered her. "Primetime" reports on the investigation, how attention focused on both Ralph Sepulveda and Brian Travers, and what the status of Servo's murder investigation is today.

And: Bethany Correira was raised in a log cabin deep in the woods near Mount McKinley, Alaska. She was home-schooled as a child and later attended a small high school, excelling in academics and sports. Correira traveled the world, from her missionary work in Nepal to sailing to the remote Norfolk Islands. But in May 2003, she moved to Anchorage to pursue medical studies in college. Four days after Correria's move, her mother, Linda, arrived at her apartment to find the door unlocked and her daughter's purse, keys and cell phone inside. Correira was nowhere to be found. When police arrived on the scene to search the apartment, a recently burned duplex next door caught the attention of Detective Glen Klinkhart. For Klinkhart, the scene would lead him on a journey to find the young woman and reclaim his passion for his work.

That burned duplex triggered a memory for Klinkhart: In 1981 he had been 16 years old when his sister was sexually assaulted, beaten, strangled and then set on fire in his family's home. Klinkhart and the rest of his family were away. "I spent a lot of time trying to figure out, you know, what I could have done," he said. "Could I have saved her?" The detective was determined to find young Bethany Correira. John Qui�ones reports on the relentless investigation Kinkhart conducted that led to solving the mystery of Bethany's disappearance and who was responsible.

DAVID SLOAN is the executive producer of ABC News' "Primetime: Crime."

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